Microeconomics of Competitiveness

Partager

HARVARD BUSINESS SCHOOL

COMPETITIVENESS AND BUSINESS

" A source of inspiration for leaders willing to engage in vibrant reflections about the fundamentals of competitiveness and to improve their understanding of their business environment, along with their company’s strategy. "


The application for the Competitiveness and Business Strategy Course includes :
  • The EGE Executive Education Center's application
  • A short resume.

The application may be completed by e-mail to :
executive.education@egerabat.com
Confirmation of acceptance will be sent upon receipt of the required forms. Qualified candidates are admitted on a rolling, space-available basis and early application is encouraged.

Program of Microeconomics of Competitiveness
  • GENERAL PRESENTATION BY MRS MARIE-CLAUDE AZZOUZI,
    Executive Manager of Ecole de Gouvernance et d'Economie de Rabat
  • AFFILIATION OF THE HARVARD MOC NETWORK

    The Harvard Microeconomics of Competitiveness (MOC) program is taught at the EGE Executive Education Center, as one of the international affiliates of the Harvard MOC Network.
    The course platform was developed at the Harvard Business School by Professor Michael Porter and a team of reputed academics.
    The EGE Executive Education Center is the only institute allowed to teach the MOC program by Harvard in the Maghreb and West Africa.
    The program is delivered by a professor trained by the Institute for Strategy and Competitiveness at the Harvard Business School

  • COMPETITIVENESS AND BUSINESS STRATEGY

    The Competitiveness and Business Strategy program lasts four days; it is an intensive, high-level executive training program and a source of inspiration for leaders willing to engage in vibrant reflections about the fundamentals of competitiveness and to improve their understanding of their business environment, along with their company's strategy.

    The course analyzes the determinants of economic competitiveness and economic growth from the perspective of the firm as well as public institutions. Based on the theoretical foundations and case studies developed by Professor Michael Porter at Harvard Business School's Institute for Strategy and Competitiveness, the MOC program studies the sources of national and regional productivity through strategies and operating practices of firms.

    It also considers how economic clusters and the quality of the business environment affect national and regional economic competitiveness. In doing so, the MOC program identifies the roles that government, firms, associations, universities, and other institutions play in creating sustained increases in productivity.

    EGE's MOC offers Morocco's executives a unique approach to studying economic competitiveness by starting from the fundamental understanding that wealth is created at the microeconomic level. MOC illustrates the key factors to economic growth and development through the lenses of microeconomic conditions and firm strategy. And by employing Harvard Business School case studies to illustrate the course's theoretical foundations, MOC enables participants to quickly grasp the essentials of the microeconomics of competitiveness

  • PROGRAM
    Part I : Analyzing Competitiveness through the Diamond Model and Economic Clusters
    Day 1 : Competitiveness and the Diamond Model

    Morning – Competitiveness and the Diamond Model: An Overview


    Harvard Business School Case: Finland and Nokia: Creating the World's Most Competitive Economy.

    Description: This module introduces participants to the definition and measures of competitiveness.
    It uses Finland as an introduction to the Harvard Business School case study method to illustrate how a country can develop a world-class economic climate and the ways in which the public and private sectors can prioritize to rapidly improve competitiveness.
    Participants then use Porter's diamond model to illustrate the interaction between four determinants of competitiveness: factor conditions, demand conditions, related and supporting industries, and firm strategy, structure, and rivalry .

    Afternoon – The Diamond Model in Practice


    Harvard Business School Cases: Estonia in Transition and Chile: The Latin American Tiger?

    Description: Participants analyze the national diamond of developing and transitioning economies and explore the decisions faced by policy makers and private sector leaders in these countries. Day 1 concludes with an analysis of Morocco's diamond and a discussion of how Morocco can employ this analysis to improve its economic competitiveness


    Part I : Analyzing Competitiveness through the Diamond Model and Economic Clusters
    Day 2 : Defining, Mapping, and Analyzing Economic Clusters

    Morning – Defining and Mapping Economic Clusters


    Harvard Business School Case: The California Wine Cluster

    Description: This module introduces participants to economic clusters by exploring what clusters are, how they are mapped, and how they contribute to productivity, competitive advantage, and innovation. Participants then use the California wine case to engage directly in cluster mapping, analyze why the California wine cluster emerged as a world leader, and study the role of the government in cluster development

    Afternoon – Economic Clusters in Developing Countries


    Harvard Business School Case: Building a Cluster: Electronics and Information Technology in Costa Rica.

    Description: This module focuses on economic cluster analysis and development in emerging economies. In analyzing the electronics and information technology cluster in Costa Rica, it shows how the interaction between diamond conditions, government policy, and multi-national corporation decision-making impacts the successful development of an economic cluster. Day 2 concludes with a discussion of economic clusters and cluster development in Morocco.
    Discussion: Cluster Development in Morocco (guest speaker).


    Part II : Developing Economic Clusters and Enhancing Moroccan Economic Competitiveness
    Day 3 : Collaborating to Develop and Internationalize Economic Clusters

    Morning – Institutional Collaboration


    Harvard Business School Cases: Asociacion Colombiana de Industrias Plasticas and Centre Suisse d'Electronique et de Microtechnique.

    Description: This module introduces participants to the ways in which institutions for collaboration affect the growth and development of economic clusters. These institutions --- industry associations, trade associations, chambers of commerce, think tanks --- can both assist and retard the growth of economic clusters. Participants then use the examples of Asociacion Colombiana de Industrias Plasticas and Centre Suisse d'Electronique et de Microtechnique to illustrate how institutions for collaboration impact economic cluster growth and development

    Afternoon – Internationalization of Clusters


    Harvard Business School Cases: The Dutch Flower Case and Atlas Electrica: International Strategy.

    Description: This module exposes participants to the mapping of an economic cluster that began as a relatively low-tech, low value-added cluster and evolved into one that employs state of the art technology and logistics to dominate the global market, even with significant barriers to competitiveness. Participants then analyze and discuss ways in which small players in developing economies can compete successfully against global giants and the steps that private sector leaders and governments can take to foster the internationalization of local companies. Day 3 concludes with a discussion of possibilities for and barriers to internationalizing Morocco's economic clusters.
    Discussion: Internationalization of Moroccan Economic Clusters (guest speaker)


    Part II : Developing Economic Clusters and Enhancing Moroccan Economic Competitiveness
    Day 4 : Economic Strategy and Moroccan Economic Competitiveness

    Morning – Economic Strategy: Developing Countries and Sub-National Regions


    Harvard Business School Cases: Rwanda: National Economic Transformation and The Basque Country: Strategy for Economic Development.

    Description: This module employs two distinct cases --- Rwanda post-genocide and Spain's Basque region --- to show ways in which government policy can both promote and hinder economic development and the growth and success of economic clusters. Participants then analyze the strategic issues faced today in both situations and propose and debate policy recommendations

    Afternoon – Moroccan Economic Competitiveness


    The Determinants of Economic Competitiveness (Delgado, Ketels, Porter, and Stern).

    Description: This module concludes the Microeconomics of Competitiveness course with an analysis of Morocco's economic competitiveness relative to its neighbors and its position internationally. It also explores regionalization within Morocco and how Morocco's regions compare to each other in terms of economic competitiveness. Day 4 concludes with an exploration of Morocco's economic strengths and weaknesses, ways in which Morocco can leverage its comparative advantages, and steps to take to address its economic shortcomings.
    Discussion: Moroccan Competitiveness: Regional and International (guest speaker) Certificates and Closing

  • SCHEDULE

    The Microeconomics and Competitiveness program will take place :
      • Session of June 2012
         • June 13th and 14th,
          • June 27th and 28th.

      • Session of September 2012
         • September 13th and 14th,
          • September 27th and 28th.

  • STRUCTURE

    The MOC program will be delivered through two parts of two days each, which will take place within a given month.

    The course includes lectures, group work, case study discussions and business simulations. Reading and case study analysis will be required.

    Option : The EGE Executive Education Center also offers trainings in specifc felds of activity.
    Companies interested in providing their high potential managers with a specialized MOC curriculum may ask for more details about this program at : http://www.egerabat.com/mocege

  • BENEFITS OF ENGAGING IN THE PROGRAM

    • Understanding the sources, the determinants and the features of competitiveness
    • Incorporating competitiveness dimensions in decision-making processes
    • Sharing a critical analysis of the methods and the limits of taking competitiveness into account in a business strategy
    • Applying the cluster model to ensure business productivity and industry performance
    • Employing the Harvard Business School case study methodology to comprehend actual business scenarios
    • Addressing the new competitiveness challenges in relation to cross-border competition
    • Networking

  • ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

    Admissions are decided by a Committee that aims at selecting the most qualifed individuals to enhance the overall learning experience of the MOC program.
    The Committee looks for applicants whose job, experience and background require an understanding of business strategy and competition. The ideal candidate is a high level manager, with at least fve years of professional experience. He or she demonstrates a strong interest in joining the program. Last, profciency in written and spoken English is necessary for the completion of the assignments and the engagement in vibrant debates.
    The Admissions Committee requires the submission of the online application and a short resume.
    It may request an interview as part of the admission process.

    Option: It is possible to organize a one-day intensive session of courses in microeconomics and case methodology for the candidates willing to maximize the benefts of the training.

  • FACULTY

    Brent Edelman is a Professor of Economics at EGE Rabat.
    He is Certifed Faculty Affliate to Harvard Business School's Microeconomics of Competitiveness program. Brent Edelman studied at Boston University, he holds a PhD in Economics and is a specialist of peer effects.
    In addition to performing research on economic growth and competitiveness in India and Ghana, he has studied the competitiveness of small-scale producers in Morocco for USAID's Morocco Economic Competitiveness program. He speaks Hindi, Uzbek, French and German.

  • CERTIFICATES

    The EGE Executive Education Center awards a certifcate upon the successful completion of the Competitiveness and Business Strategy program. The certifcate includes a brief description of the course content, dates of participation and the sector of specialization if applicable.

  • LANGUAGE

    The program is delivered in English and requires a considerable amount of reading. Particpants are required to engage in debates.
    In order to maximize the educational experience an networking opportunities, it is highly recommended that all applicants are fuent in English.

  • FEES

    • Special offer for the frst session : 24 500 DHS
    • Normal price : 39 500 DHS (Contact EGE Executive education center for special group rates).
    The fee includes tuition, course materials, lunch and a certifcate of participation. Payment is due upon receipt of acceptance into the program and must be completed at least one week before the course start date to receive the material.
    No candidacy will be accepted unless it contains a reservation check.
    If the candidate is not selected, the entire fee will be returned.

  • APPLICATION PROCESS

    The application for the Competitiveness and Business Strategy Course is available at http://www.egerabat.com/mocege.
    The application process includes:
    • the EGE Executive Education Center's application,
    • a short resume.
    The application may be completed by e-mail to : executive.education@egerabat.com Confrmation of acceptance will be sent upon receipt of the required forms.
    Qualifed candidates are admitted on a rolling, space-available basis and early application is encouraged.
    Deadline for application is June 7th, 2012 for the frst session, and September 7th for the second session

  • CANCELLATION POLICY

    All cancellations incur a 20% penalty.
    Cancellations made within 14 calendar days of the start date will incur 50% penalty.
    There will be no refund for withdrawals on or after the frst day of the seminar.
    All cancellation/transfer requests must be received in writing.